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MADHOUSE re:exit
14 Wednesday 14th March

MADHOUSE re:exit

Shorditch Town Hall

380 Old Street, London, EC1V 9LT

Price: £10 - £15
Time: 7pm, 7.30pm, 8pm & 8.30pm
Starts: Tue 13th Mar
Ends: Wed 28th Mar

Learning disabled artists campaign and provoke in a striking new piece of theatre in East London.

This March, award winning theatre company Access All Areas will present MADHOUSE re:exit - an interactive, immersive experience at Shoreditch Town Hall, inspired by the institutionalisation of people with learning disabilities in the UK. This innovative production will then transfer to the Lowry’s festival Week 53 in May.

Set in a corporate care facility that promises a revolution in social services, five learning disabled artists will take the audience on a fantastical, disruptive journey that explores what institutions mean to people with learning disabilities today.

With a refusal to be silent, and a history of being ignored, these artists will reside in a maze-like institution, growling to be heard, and waiting for a revolution that is forever promised. Illusionist David Munns questions whether the Victorian label of freak persists today; choreographer DJ Hassan spins between joy and loneliness; Dayo Koleosho asks how easy it is for learning disabled people to live independently; Imogen Roberts celebrates the ancient Olmec tribe who worshipped those with Down Syndrome as gods; and acclaimed performance poet Cian Binchy imagines himself as London’s oldest baby.

Binchy, who was the autism consultant on The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time and whose autobiographical show The Misfit Analysis is now touring the world, began to respond artistically to how government cuts effect his life after Theresa May was confronted by a voter with a learning disability on the campaign trail. For Binchy, this now infamous exchange highlighted how little the government understands the support needs of people with learning disabilities.



Don't Panic Agency