There was an error : - Error calling GET https://www.googleapis.com/analytics/v3/data/realtime?ids=ga%3A333311&metrics=rt%3Apageviews&dimensions=rt%3ApagePath: (403) Quota Error: profileId ga:333311 has exceeded the daily request limit. Magazine | Music | bristol

A CHAT WITH LOEFAH

A chat with Loefah
Comments

A CHAT WITH LOEFAH



11 Tuesday 11th March 2014

With their first compilation not released , the creation of the UMG ‘Under My Label’ will showcase five different Belgian artists -Tixhon (UMG resident DJ) , Kafim, Le Motel, Uber & BlazeRod.

Developing their previous chillwave/post dubstep nights to a roster of more techno orientated UK Bass culture sets enabled artists such as Loefah to grace the decks at UMG. Following his set we managed to have a quick chat with the man himself.

FP:How does it feel to play a gig abroad compared to UK club nights? Is it different playing to a scene here compared to the UK?

L: Yeah, quite a bit, it's no so much the geography but more the culture of the place. I don’t usually play in the north of Europe and haven’t done in ages, similar things happen each time as the area is more about the party rather than the club, so you know when you go to a certain city what kind of party its going to be.

FP:From your experience in different cities have there been any places that particularly stood out for you?

L: Yeah there are definitely cities that you can’t wait to get to. London is one of the toughest; it’s hard, as they know what’s going on. Like a tune that still might be new in the rest of the country, they expect you to be upfront and cutting edge. If you're not the absolute top of your game in London the crowd will challenge you, there have been a lot of shows that have been really hard work, but If you can win the crowd over its better than anywhere else in the world.

FP:It seems fair to say that the launch of Swamp was a highly personal venture. Can you explain how it felt launching Swamp, as it proffers an entirely different and fresh experience to crowds who knew you for you DMZ reputation?

L: In a way yeah, it’s a funny one as its all to my personal taste. Its been really cool, quite intriguing. Looking back on it all, I continued with what I was doing without the parameters of dubstep. As I’ve always liked sub bass and drum machines, switching away from dubstep opened the doors to the traditional forms of dance music, which were influenced by house, or techno. We were trying something new and going back to the source - essentially returning to the start and seeing where it would take us. The newest releases of Swamp is almost sounding like early experimental dubstep.

FP:Would you say the original dubstep sound you pioneered still has any bearing on the nature of the sound today? 

L: Yes definitely, you know what’s different now? Everyone’s an individual- not as many work together. When we started with dubstep there was a load of people who needed to do something together and we created a scene which was new, where as now people seem to stay individual, so it’s the rule of the individual and less of the collective. When the idea of dubstep was coming together we were refering back to jungle - I would have thought there would have been a new something that would have picked up from that, as the crowds change every two to three years, a new generation should have come through so all the new influences have different points of reference.

FP:Do you think that this aspect has been affected by the age of digital?

L: Yeah  its funny how media savvy people have become  - you get kids who get one track out and all of a sudden they have a whole team around them - it could stifle them a bit. Having so much security might not support them in the same way as when you create things with other people. When you produce it is essentially a reaction to the world around you, it's what is going within our camp at the moment in time - it’s a good creative outlet.

FP:Kingsmill or hovis?

L:**laughs** Ah I don’t even eat bread!

Loefah will be playing at Fabric, London on March 14th. Find the full UMG intervew here

Don't Panic attempt to credit photographers and content owners wherever possible, however due to the sheer size and nature of the internet this is sometimes impractical or impossible. If you see any images on our site which you believe belong to yourself or another and we have incorrectly used it please let us know at panic@dontpaniconline.com and we will respond asap.



Comments